BUSINESS

Mr Green operator gets Swedish regulatory approval

TAGs: Mr Green, Sweden

Malta-based MRG became the latest company to receive approval to operate online gambling sites in Sweden.

Mr Green operator gets Swedish regulatory approvalIn a press release, the company announced that its subsidiaries Mr Green Ltd and Evoke Gaming Ltd had been granted two licenses by state regulator Lotteriinspektionen, allowing it to offer its sites, which include Mr Green, Redbet, Vinnarum, Bertil, and MamaMiaBingo, effective January 1, 2019.

MRG CEO Per Norman said, “We are especially happy about the strong emphasis on responsible gaming in the Swedish regulation since Green Gaming has been part of our strategy since the start of the company ten years ago.”

For 2018, Mr Green Ltd also received regulatory approval for its sportsbook license in Denmark. Redbet, meanwhile, was awarded a sportsbook license, in Ireland. Through the acquisition of the site 11.lv, MRG is now also able to operate in Latvia.

The Lotteriinspektionen began issuing its online gambling licenses late November, initially approving 16 of 95 processed applications. Among the new licensees are state-run Svenska Spel and AB Trav & Galopp, as well as the Kindred Group, LeoVegas, and Betsson, among other private firms.

LeoVegas, which also has licenses for Denmark, Ireland, Italy, Malta, and the UK, has submitted applications to run online casino and sports betting in Spain, and expects to enter the country’s market by next year.

Approved just last week by the Lotteriinspektionen were Videoslots Ltd for its Videoslots.com site, and Global Gaming subsidiary SafeEnt Ltd, which runs Ninjacasino.com and Spellandet.com.

The Swedish regulator has announced a branding change, in which it will be known as Spelinspektionen beginning January 1, to better reflect its expanded regulatory mandate.

Sweden passed legislation in June that officially opened its online market to international operators, though some had already established a presence in the country. By regulating these foreign companies, the Swedish government gets an 18% cut from revenues, on top of payments for licenses, which remain valid for five years.

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