CASINO

Tribal casino near Omaha gets greenlight

TAGs: Iowa, mississippi, National Indian Gaming Association, Nebraska, Omaha

The National Indian Gaming Commission (NIGC) has backed plans of the Ponca Tribe of Nebraska to construct a casino near Omaha.

Tribal casino near Omaha gets greenlightNIGC’s approval came nearly a decade after it gave the proposed casino in Carter Lake, Iowa the thumbs up, according to the U.S. News.

The Ponca tribe had wanted to build a casino in the area since 2003 but the land where the gambling facility would be constructed was subject to a legal question before the court.

Ponca Tribal chairman Larry Wright, Jr. hailed the NIGC’s decision, saying that the casino they are planning to build will provide significant new resources for the tribe and its members.

“This is an economic engine that will help our tribe move forward and diversify into other areas,” Wright said.

Under the initial plan of the Ponca Tribe, the casino will have 2,000 slot machines, 50 table games and a 150-room hotel. It estimates the project would create 1,800 jobs.

The states of Iowa and Nebraska, however, aren’t happy about the new casino plan since the area, particularly the city of Council Bluffs, Iowa, is already teeming with several casinos.

Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians to decide on Red Water Casino’s fate

Down south, the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians are putting the fate of the Red Water Casino to a vote.

The Neshoba Democrat reported that the Choctaw Indians will cast their votes on the following referendum question:

“Be it enacted by the members of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, should the Tribal Council Resolution CHO 17-033 authorizing a new Class III gaming casino in the Red Water community remain in effect?”

If a majority of the tribal members decide in favor of Red Water Casino, officials estimate that at least 200 new jobs will be created for their members.

Red Water Casino will be the Tribe’s fourth gaming facility in Mississippi after the two interlinked casinos in Neshoba County and the Bok Homa community near Sandersville in Jones County.

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